2011-11-10 / The Office Cat

‘Don’t forget to keep smiling’

Thinking of Veterans Day Friday, Lois Poss remembered a letter that her late husband, Richard Jones, had written to his family during World War II. It’s an interesting letter and is a clear indication of what so many of our World War II veterans endured for our freedom. Some excerpts from it are included here. The letter is dated March 12, 1945, A Foxhole in Germany. (That says a lot). Richard writes, “This paper is some captured German stationery that was given to me by the chaplain yesterday. We are going to be relieved tonight and go back to the rear for a day or so, and I guess the Jerry knows it because they have tossed a couple of shells this way this afternoon. No casualties though. I don’t think we will have to walk very far to the trucks and I sure hope not because I have to carry a belt of ammo, three grenades, my gas mask, bedroll, and three bazooka shells. ... I hope you won’t worry too much about me because I am not afraid of the future except to worry about how it would affect you if anything should happen to me. I believe in Christ and am a child of God, so no matter what happens I will be all right even if I pass through the Valley of the Shadow. Don’t think this letter means that I expect to be killed because I don’t. I expect to come home in one piece when this is all over. Don’t forget to keep smiling.”

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Sunday afternoon, November 13, is the time for the Duo Intermezzo concert featuring Ruth Berry, cellist; and Kevin Pollock, piano. The concert will be at 3 p.m. at The Bolton Lunceford Playhouse on North Alexander Avenue. The program includes a variety of types of music that should please everyone. Tickets will be available at the door for $10 each.

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Who says that real estate is selling at a very slow rate in Wilkes County! I know of two in-town house that have been sold in the last two weeks. Gloria Rhodes has bought the house at the corner of East Robert Toombs Avenue and Grove Street (across Grove Street from the Washington-Wilkes Historic Museum), and is already living there. She says her house on Liberty Street will be for sale as soon as she gets everything moved to her new location. ... Martha Reeves and Bill Frost have bought the former home of Ann Tanner and the late Jack Tanner at the corner of Elm and Spring streets. This is the old Johnson homeplace that was restored several years ago by the late Smythe Newsome. ... And Archie and Crean Brown recently sold their house on Court Street.

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Tink's Grass-fed beef at Lucky 7W Farm in Wilkes County is mentioned in an article in the current Georgia Magazine. The title of the article by Jane F. Garvey, is “Going for grass: Georgia’s got great grass-fed and pasture-raised meat.” The article goes on to say that Tink’s Beef also does pasture-raised pork. “Tink’s sausage is so tasty and lean it leaves almost no fat in the pan,” says the writer. The farm is owned and operated by Etwenda Wade.

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Rain is still scarce in Wilkes County. Most of us had a good shower last Thursday night, with Tyrone reporting almost .4 of an inch; Hill Street, .3 of an inch; and I had .4 of an inch. Hill Street got a total of 3.8 inches for October and 36 inches for the year thus far.

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The Washington-Wilkes Tiger Marching Band participated in Newnan’s “Old South Classic” marching competition Saturday and placed third overall in Class Single A. The percussion unit received third place; and the majorettes second in Single A competition. The band received a rating of excellent; the colorguard, excellent; percussion, excellent; drum major, excellent; and the majorettes received a superior rating. Jeff Thomas is director of the Washington-Wilkes bands.

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Eddie Finnell was taking advantage of a beautiful fall day Monday by touring around town in his beautifully restored 1949 Plymouth and came by to show it to me. The Body Shop that used to be on the corner of Allison Street and West Robert Toombs Avenue did the restoration and painting of the body and the upholstery was done in Elberton. It’s a nice color of green, so be on the lookout for it.

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There was a lengthy article in Sunday's Augusta Chronicle about the Washington-Wilkes Middle School and it was on the front page of the paper. The title of the article was “School succeeding while peers struggle” and it recognized the recent achievements at the school. There was a picture of Principal Deleki Lee and assistant principal Ricky Dorminy Washington-Wilkes was recently identified as one of 12 “successful middle schools” in a report by the Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education. The article states that “the school (WWMS) stands out from most of the others in several ways, most notably in that it shares characteristics with some Richmond County schools. It (W-W) is the only Augusta-area school on the list. Most of the rest are clustered in and around the Atlanta metro region.”

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I owe a big thank you to personnel at Wilkes Watchman that monitors my security system at home and to Lt. Robert Roca of the Washington Police Department for their help in getting a squirrel out of my house last week. The squirrel had gotten into the main part of my house (den, living room, dining room, etc.) and the motion had set off the alarm. I got a call from Wilkes Watchman and when I got home Lt. Roca was waiting for me. We managed to chase the squirrel out the front door. ... Meanwhile, Gloria Wheatley at the Washington-Wilkes Animal Shelter has brought me a beautiful outdoor cat to see if we can run some squirrels off. I will be adopting him and squirrel-chaser or not, he’s a beautiful animal.

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Dot Harris brought me an update on hummingbirds for the winter. Some Washington-Wilkes people have wondered if they should leave their feeders out for a while. The article says that the Georgia Department of Natural Resources has requested that we keep at least one hummingbird feeder filled over the winter. It’s for western species that we would rarely see hovering with the one species nesting east of the Mississippi, our native ruby-throats. Western hummingbirds, it says, can arrive in Georgia beginning in August, and the first sighting this year occurred September 10 -- a rufous hummer. The rufous is the feistiest of all North American hummers and the most frequent over-wintering ones in the Southeast with more than 100 documented sightings in Georgia in 2007. So, hang in there, hummingbird fans.

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Dr. Jim Finch ha been having chemo and radiation treatment for cancer and was in the hospital last week. Dr. Bruce Holes opened Dr. Finch’s dental office in the afternoon to treat patients so that Dr. Finch does not get too far behind on his schedule. ... I’m sure that was an appreciated good deed.

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